Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Interview with Debby Lee - Day Two

Debby Lee has always enjoyed writing since she was a small child. Besides the Christian Writers Guild, and the American Christian Fiction Writers, she is an active member in several chapters of Romance Writers of America, where she’s served on a committee and held an office in her local chapter.



Welcome back today, Debby.What do you consider the best resources for historical research?

I know what works best for me and what I enjoy the most is historical re-enactments, the hands-on events where I can make candles, do old fashioned blacksmithing, and work an old spinning wheel. I also like documentaries and movies about 1800’s America.

What or who inspired you to write inspirational fiction? How does that keep you plodding ahead with your writing each day?

When I received a scholarship to attend the Jerry Jenkins Writing for the Soul conference, I knew that was my calling. That was what God wanted me to do with my life.

At times this has really motivated me to stay on the path that God has for me, especially with my writing career. A great many things came together for me to get to that conference, and I’ve tried very hard not to waste the opportunity He provided to me. I work hard and try to keep every writing decision coated in prayer.

What helps you maintain productivity as a writer? And what do you find most challenging about the business of being an author?

My local RWA chapter has many motivating events to help me with productivity. One I got the most out of is the 100X100 Challenge, where an author writes at least 100 words for a minimum of 100 days. It can be tailored to fit the writer’s individual needs, by skipping days or pushing straight through to 100. I opted to write Monday through Friday, Saturday was optional and I didn’t put words to paper on Sundays.

For me, the biggest challenge is finding the time to write. With a husband, five kids and a job, a lot of times I have to write in short snippets, like when I’m waiting for them at the dentist or while I’m on breaks at work. Most the time, I wait for them to go to bed and then put in my writing time.
Do you feel you are more of a character driven or plot driven writer? How do you think it comes across in your writing?

I think I’m definitely a plot driven writer. Even though I’m a panster, I can come up with a number of elaborate plots in my head. The downside is that my characters tend to be one dimensional and not very deep. I’m working on taking some classes on characterization.

Would you like to share about what you are working on now?

I’ve always dreamed of writing for Heartsong Presents, so I’m working on editing a historical manuscript I think would fit that line. It takes place during WWII and is set in the farmlands of Washington state. I’m also working on a short story set in 1968 and deals with my Native American heritage.

Do you have any last words of wisdom to share with aspiring authors?

If God has called you to write, then keep writing, keep learning and keep striving to be the best writer you can be.

Thank you, Debby, for joining us at Novel PASTimes. It has been a privilege to interview you.

Please leave a comment by answering the question Debby is asking
below for a chance to win a copy of her novella in A Cascades Christmas.
Don't forget to include your email address in the form of name[at]domain[dot]com before 8:30 a.m. EDT this Friday morning to qualify for the drawing.

Debby's question: Have you ever visited Tumwater or Toledo Washington? If so, when? And what did you think of the place?

4 comments:

Debby Lee said...

Thank you Kathleen and everyone else at Novel Past Times for allowing me this fantastic opportunity to be a guest on the blog. As I said before, it's been quite an adventure,

Kathleen Rouser said...

Thank you, Debby for being our guest!

I've never been far enough west to go to Tumwater
or Toledo, WA, only Toledo, OH. but I'm guessing they're much different.

Thanks for all the comments, readers! Keep them
coming. We love to hear from you.

karenk said...

thanks for the chance to read this fabulous novel :)

karenk
kmkuka at yahoo dot com

Jes said...

Doing old-fashioned blacksmithing and working an old spinning wheel as part of your research must have been fun!

Jes
jswaks at gmail dot com