Tuesday, January 15, 2013

An interview with Mary Moore


Author Mary Moore
Mary Moore has been writing historical fiction for more than 15 years. After battling and beating breast cancer, Mary is even more excited about her career, as she tries to incorporate some of her struggles throughout her books. She is dedicated to encouraging others in the Lord and using her writing for God’s glory.

Mary is a native of the Washington, DC area, but she and her husband, Craig, now live in the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains in southwestern Virginia. When not writing, she loves to read, minister in her church, and spend time with her husband and black lab, Darcy.

Remember to read all the way to the end, so you’ll see Mary’s question for you. Answer it in the comments for your chance to win a copy of her latest novel, Beauty in Disguise.



Hello, Mary, and thanks for joining us at Novel PASTimes! We’re glad to have this chance to learn more about you and your books. Tell us a little bit about the storyline for Beauty in Disguise.

After her scandalous first Season, Lady Kathryn needs a new beginning. Concealing her stunning hair and sapphire eyes beneath a dowdy fa├žade, she’s grateful to earn her keep as companion, Kate Montgomery. Until she comes face-to-face with her past in Lord Dalton, the only man she has ever loved.

The debutante Dalton fell in love with years ago was beautiful beyond compare. The gentle, mysterious young woman he encounters at a country house has qualities he now values more highly -- until he learns of her deception. Kate has broken his heart not once, but twice.

Can faith help him see that love, like true beauty, always comes to light?



That sounds wonderful! Tell us more about your main characters, if it’s not giving away too many secrets.

Lady Kathryn has to make her own way in the world. The two choices she has as a lady of quality are as a companion or a governess. But she is so beautiful that she is considered fair game for any males in the house. So she must don a disguise to get a position.

Lord Dalton had once loved Lady Kathryn. But she disappeared from all Society and he joined the military. He is now back, nine years later, visiting the same house Lady Kathryn lives in as the companion to the eldest daughter. She is afraid to reveal herself to him and that begins the fireworks!



What drew you toward writing historical romance? What do you like most about it?

I began reading Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer novels when I was 15 years old. I have been in love with the Regency era ever since. It is such a great time to write in because of the manners and style of the time. I love the language and the clothes as well as the history associated with that time period. I even love the horrible side of life for those not blessed to have money and social standing. I try to incorporate as much of each into my novels.







What sparked the idea for Beauty in Disguise, or any of your other titles you’d like to share about?

In my first book, The Aristocrat’s Lady, the heroine has a disability and is shuffled from doctor to doctor trying to “fix” her. I have had that experience with doctors and I wondered how I might incorporate that in the book.

But mostly, ideas just come to me. I always keep a pad of paper next to my bed and in the car. It seems to me that’s where they usually hit me! I write down the idea, then sketch out a basic plan and put it in my “To Write” box.



Very interesting – just another way of showing how fiction imitates real life. Historical fiction also requires a lot of research – much more than people sometimes realize. What’s the most interesting (or unusual, or funny) thing you’ve done in the name of research for a book?

I have a black thumb…no if’s and’s or but’s about it. If you give me a plant that is alive I will kill it! For the first book, horticulture and gardening were important to the plot and I read an entire book on the horticulture of that time period. And because I cannot grow any plant, its only value was for the book, I couldn’t apply any of the interesting things I learned in my own garden (I should say my husband’s garden, he doesn’t let me mess with flowers!) :O)



If you could be any character from another historical novel, who would it be and why?

Come back tomorrow for Mary’s answer to this question, and more. And, don’t forget to answer her question for you, so you can be entered in our drawing to win your own copy of Beauty in Disguise. Here’s her question for you:

Are you a fan of the Regency era? Why or why not?

It’s a great question that should get some good discussion going! Include your email (spelling out ‘at’ and ‘dot’ to help cut down on spam) with your answer. The drawing will be held Friday morning at approximately 8 a.m. EST.

See you tomorrow!

4 comments:

Sarah said...

I am a fan of Regency!!!
I would love to win,Enter me!!!
Thanks for the giveaway and God Bless!!!
Sarah Richmond
sarahrichmond.12@gmail.com

Anonymous said...


Yes, I do love the Regency Era. I love the Big fancy homes, and the Fancy Ladies and Lords. But, I don't like the snobbery part. I even enjoy the story parts about the servants. Some of them have interesting stories too! It is just a good read. Hope I can win your book Mary. I don't have one of your books yet.
Maxie mac262(at)me(dot)com

karenk said...

Yes, I love the Regency Era.

Thanks for the chance to read this story.

karenk
kmkuka at yahoo dot com

Mary Moore said...

Thank you, ladies for coming by. I'm so glad you enjoy Regencies.

Dear Anonymous, I'm with you! I do love the clothes and houses and cool manners of Society. But I always try to include something about the underside of the era. In my first book, The Aristocrat's Lady, the heroine had a trusted servant that was always at her side because of a disability. A lot of people wanted a story just on him! In this book, the heroine has fallen on hard times and must make her own living. She has to deal with the seedy side of being a beautiful woman caught as nothing more than a glorified servant. So I like to include the other side as well as the glitter of high Society.