Sunday, February 07, 2016

This Week in History 2/7 - 2/13

This Week in History

February 7:
  • Walt Disney's 2nd feature-length movie, Pinocchio, premieres (1940)
  • Author Charles Dickens is born (1812)
  • 8.2 earthquake shakes New Madrid, Missouri, the largest earthquake in the United States (1812)
  • Earthquake causes tsunami in Mississippi (1812)
  • The Mud March was the first large procession organized by the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies (1907)
  • Beatles arrive in New York (1964)
  • WW2: German theologian Deitrich Bonhoeffer was sent to Buchenwald Concentration Camp for his part in the resistance to Nazis (1945)
  • 11th Amendment to US Constitution ratified affirming the power of states (1795)
  • WW2: Dr. Josef Mengele, the infamous Nazi doctor who performed medical experiments at the Auschwitz death camps, dies of a stroke while swimming in Brazil (1979)
  • John Deere, pioneer American blacksmith and manufacturer of agricultural equipment who founded Deere & Company, is born (1804)
  • Senator Joe McCarthy finds "communists" in US Department of State (1950)
  • Cassius Clay converts to Islam and renames himself Muhammad Ali (1964)
  • Charlie Chaplin debuts The Tramp (1914)
  • Birth of Hannah Whitall Smith, American Quaker evangelist and devotional author (1832)
  • Harvey Samuel Firestone, founder Firestone Tire Company, dies (1938)
February 8:
  • According to The Handbook of Biblical Chronology, Paul left Malta to sail to Rome (58 AD)
  • Stars & Stripes, weekly US armed forces newspaper, first published (1918)
  • US Civil War: Confederate States of America organizes in Montgomery, Alabama (1861)
  • WW2: Lodtz, first large ghetto established by Nazis in Poland, opens (1940)
  • US Civil War: Martin Robison Delany become first black man appointed as a major in US Army (1865)
  • WW2: Harry McAlpin becomes first black reporter accredited to White House,  (1944)
  • Under the Dawes Act, Indians living apart from tribe granted citizenship (1887)
  • Disney Brothers Cartoon Studio becomes Walt Disney Studios (1926)
  • The College of William and Mary was founded in Williamsburg, Virginia for the purpose of educating Anglican clergyman (1693)
  • Enforcement Act repealed making it easier to enact Jim Crow laws and disenfranchise blacks (1894)
  • The Boy Scouts of America is incorporated by William D. Boyce (1910)
  • D. W. Griffith's silent film The Birth of a Nation (1915)
  • Elizabeth II is proclaimed Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, etc (1952)
  • As Roman troops surrounded the church in Alexandria, Egypt, Bishop Athanasius escaped for the third time (356 AD)
  • Peter the Great, emperor of Russia, dies and is succeeded by his wife, Catherine (1725)
  • Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake premieres in St Petersburg (1895)
  • Giordano Bruno, astronomer who was called a martyr for science, was condemned to death by the Vatican
  • Mary Queen of Scots beheaded (1587)
  • Paul Brown agrees to coach the new American football expansion team in Cleveland which would later be named the Cleveland Browns after their coach (1945)
  • Last edition of Saturday Evening Post (1969)
  • 1800 Unification church couples wed in Korea (1975)
  • The first execution by lethal gas in American history is carried out in Carson City, Nevada. when Tong Lee, head of a Chinese gang, is executed (1924)
February 9:
  • Apollonia of Alexandria, a Christian teenager threw herself in the fire a mob had build to martyr her when she was ordered to deny Christ (249 AD)
  • US Civil War: Tennessee votes against secession (1861)
  • US Army establishes US National Weather Service (1870)
  • Puritan John Hooper was burned at the stake during Queen Mary's reign (1555)
  • American Indian Society organizes (1822)
  • First federal legislation prohibiting narcotics is enacted against opium (1909)
  • WW2: Nazi collaborators destroy pro-Jewish cafĂ© Alcazar in Amsterdam when Alcazar refused to hang "No Entry for Jews" signs in front of cafe (1941)
  • WW2: Daylight Savings War Time goes into effect in US (1942)
  • First appearance of Beatles on Ed Sullivan Show (1964)
February 10:
  • Joseph Lister, surgeon who discovers germs caused infections, died (1912)
  • The Church of England first authorized use of the 1885 English Revised Version of the Bible in Anglican liturgy and worship (1899)
  • USSR swaps spy Francis Gary Power to US for Rudolph Abel as depicted in movie Bridge of Spies (1962)
  • Tom & Jerry created by Hanna & Barbera debut by MGM (1940)
  • Glenn Miller awarded first ever gold record for selling one million copies of Chattanooga Choo Choo (1942)
  • President Eisenhower warns against US intervention in Vietnam (1955)
  • YWCA, Young Women's Christian Association, forms in New York City (1870)
  • First US fire extinguisher patent granted to Alanson Crane, Virginia (1863)
  • Japan and Russia declare war (1904)
  • Author Laura Ingalls Wilder dies at age 90 (1957)
  • Shirley Temple dies at age 85 (2014)
  • Beginning of Mormon march to western US (1846)
  • New York Times begins using slogan "All the News That's Fit to Print" (1897)
February 11:
  • WW2: US General Eisenhower selected to command the allied armies in Europe (1942)
  • Robert Fulton patents steamboat (1809)
  • US Civil War: US House unanimously passes resolution guaranteeing noninterference with slavery in any state (1861)
  • US Revolutionary War: Stamp Act declared unconstitutional in Virginia (1666)
  • Vatican City was established as the smallest nation in the world at 109 acres (1929)
  • Tiberius Claudius Caesar Britannicus, heir to the Roman Emperorship, dies under mysterious circumstances in Rome clearing the way for Nero to become Emperor (55 AD)
  • Traditional date for the foundation of Japan by Emperor Jimmu (660 BC)
  • Society of Friends petitions Congress for abolition of slavery (1790)
  • Archie comic book debuts (1942)
  • Henry Kissinger unveils Nixon Administration's seven-point "Project Independence" plan to make the U.S. energy independent (1990)
  • Henry VIII recognized as supreme head of Church in England following the schism with Rome following his divorce and excommunication (1531)
  • Henry Kissinger unveils Nixon Administration's seven-point "Project Independence" plan to make the U.S. energy independent (1974)
  • American Physiological Society organizes in Boston (1837)
  • In Lourdes, France, 14-year-old French peasant Bernadette Soubirous experienced her first vision of the Virgin Mary (1858)
  • Rev. Barbara C. Harris was consecrated in Boston as the first woman bishop in the Anglican Church (1989)
February 12:
  • The Pentecostal awakening known as the "Latter Rain Movement" traces its origin to this date, when students at the Sharon Orphanage and Schools in North Battleford, Saskatchewan, Canada began experiencing a mass spiritual awakening (1948)
  • Abraham Lincoln is born in a log cabin in Kentucky (1809)
  • Dedication ceremony for the about to be constructed Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. (1914)
  • Vietnam War: First US POWs in North Vietnam released when 116 of 456 flown to Philippines (1973)
  • Presbyterian minister Henry Highland Garnet, ex-slave, became the first black man to address US Congress when he preached against slavery (1865)
  • WW2: German troops entered Austria (1938)
  • Creek Indian treaty signed when Tribal chiefs agree to turn over all their land in Georgia to the government & migrate west by Sept 1, 1826 (1825)
  • Georgia founded by James Oglethorpe at site of Savannah (1733)
  • First US fugitive slave law passed requiring return of escaped slaves (1793)
  • Cotton Mather, Puritan preacher who supported Salem Witch Trials, was born (1663)
  • Queen of England for nine days, Lady Jane Grey is executed for treason (1554)
  • Last Ch'ing Manchu emperor of China, Hsuan T'ung, abdicates (1912)
February 13:
  • Abraham Lincoln declared president of the United States (1861)
  • The last original Peanuts comic strip appears in newspapers one day after Charles M. Schulz dies (2000)
  • Israel acquires 4 of 7 Dead Sea scrolls (1955)
  • US Civil War: First military action to result in Congressional Medal of Honor in Arizona (1861)
  • First US surgical operation for relief of angina pectoris in Cleveland, Ohio (1935)
  • Barbie doll goes on sale (1959)
  • Dissident Nobel writer Alexander Solzhenitsyn expelled from USSR (1974)
  • Longest sentence published by New York Times-1286 words (1981)
  • Moving picture projector patented (1895)
  • The American Temperance Society, later renamed the American Temperance Union, was organized in Boston (1826)
  • Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei arrived in Rome for trial before Inquisition for professing belief that earth revolves around the Sun (1633)
  • Johann Strauss' "Blue Danube" waltz premieres in Vienna (1867)
  • Flemish missionary Joris van Geel departs to Congo (1651)
  • Jesse James holds up his 1st bank, Liberty, Missouri (1866)
  • Death of Lloyd C. Douglas, Congregational clergyman and novelist (1951)
  • The Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics discovers the universe's largest known diamond, white dwarf star BPM 37093 (2004)
  • Riot in New York due to a combination of poverty and increase in the cost of flour (1837)
* Reprinted from Word Sharpeners with permission. 

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