Thursday, March 23, 2017

Review: Three Maids for a Crown

Ella March Chase
By Ella March Chase
Broadway Books, August 2011

About the Book

In the second novel from Ella March Chase, we meet sixteen-year-old Jane Grey, a quiet and obedient young lady destined to become the shortest reigning English monarch. Her beautiful middle sister Katherine Grey charms all the right people—until loyalties shift. And finally Lady Mary Grey, a dwarf with a twisted spine whose goal is simply to protect people she loves—but at a terrible cost.

In an age in which begetting sons was all that mattered and queens rose and fell on the sex of their child, these three girls with royal Tudor blood lived under the dangerous whims of parents with a passion for gambling. The stakes they would wager: their daughters’ lives against rampant ambition.

My Review

I enjoyed this author’s writing style and perspective. Normally I would read books like this in a day, or two at the most, but I’ve been pretty busy lately so I haven’t had much time to read. That said, I would definitely recommend this book. I have always found the reluctance of Jane Grey to be appointed queen and being forced to marry at fifteen a bit of a travesty. Women had no rights and were used as pawns back then. And being of royal blood makes the issue that much worse, especially if people wanted you to help their family take over the kingdom. This story was told over time through the perspectives of the three sisters. They all experienced grief and loss. They were all used by their parents to further the family’s ambition and power. None were truly valued for themselves.

At any rate, I found the story tragically beautiful. The love stories of the two remaining Grey sisters, of Lady Mary and Lady Katherine, was emotionally moving. I felt their pain and the denial of true love by the crown. They had to marry in secret and hope to be forgiven, but Elizabeth was not a forgiving queen, at least from the perspective of the “sisters of royal blood”. She always saw them as a threat and kept them imprisoned or in her service. I loved how Lady Mary Grey pitied Queen Elizabeth whose fear put her in a prison of her own making.

Good story and worth the read for the take-away value alone. It made me think about the meaning of true love and commitment to family. I am glad I picked up a copy.

Michelle Szymanoski

1 comment:

Roger said...

Nice to read this review.Thank you so much for sharing this review.